08-14 Terrassa: Conjunto monumental visigòtico-romànic de Sant Pere de Ègara

I got up at my usual time (slightly after 6:00) had a leisurely breakfast etc., and just missed the first bus. Let’s see…once is an accident, twice is a coincidence, and three times is a pattern. I’ll have to try to not make this a pattern. Missing the bus wasn’t important—I wasn’t sure when the train left, but my notes to myself indicate that there are “lots.” I bought my ticket at Plaça Catalunya and didn’t have long to wait for the next train.

The Conjunto monumental visigòtico-romànic de Sant Pere de Égara consists of three churches with preromanesque (in fact visigothic) origins: Sant Pere, Sant Miquel, and Santa Maria. In addition there are the remains of other buildings: Iberian and Roman (fifth century BC to third century AD), paleochristian (fourth century), the conjunt episcopal d’ Égara (fourth to eighth centuries), Romanesque (ninth to thirteenth centuries), and later periods. It was not unusual to have three religious buildings in close proximity; one might be used as a cathedral, one as a church for the common people, while the third might be a baptistery or funerary chapel. This case is unusual in that the three buildings are equal in importance.

When I arrived the gate was open so I walked in and started to have a close look at and take photographs of Sant Pere, the northernmost church. It was open so I took a look inside; the cleaning staff was at work so I decided to continue on to Sant Miquel and return to look at the interior of Sant Pere later.

I was examining Sant Miquel when a security guard came and said that I would have to leave until the conjunct opened at 10:00. I asked him about the Castell cartoixa de Vallparadís and he pointed to a large building to the south but told me that it closed today, that I would have to come back tomorrow. He then immediately corrected himself–tomorrow was the Feast of Saint Mary, a holiday, and everything would be closed.

The Castell was built in the twelfth century houses a museum which would have been interesting. I walked around the Castell cartoixa de Vallparadís and took some photos until the conjunct opened.

Castell Cartoixa de Vallparadís

When time came I went back to the conjunto monumental visigòtico-romànic de Sant Pere de Égara. As I said, this consists of three Romanesque churches. From the north to the south these are:

Sant Pere, mainly built in the tenth to twelfth centuries, is the largest of the three churches. The apse and transept are ninth and tenth centuries.

Sant Pere from the South

Sant Pere from the South East

The apse has geometric motives from the tenth century. There are also frescoes from the eleventh century.

The Interior of Sant Pere

Sant Pere Fresco

Sant Miquel is square (rather it is a cross with equal arms and square chapels in each of the corners) with a polygonal apse at the east.

Sant Miquel

There are sculpted capitals on the pillars which hold up the cupola and frescoes in the apse. In some ways it reminds me of a baptistery. [608]

The Interior of Sant Miquel

Santa Maria also has frescoes. These are in the apse (tenth century, difficult to see).

The Frescoes in the Apse of Santa Maria

The chapel in the south transcept also has frescos (late twelfth to mid thirteenth century, in red and green) which depict a Christ in majesty and the martyrdom of sant Tomàs Becket.

The Martyrdom of Thomas Becket

The Martyrdom of Thomas Becket

The Martyrdom of Thomas Becket

To the south of Santa Maria there are the remains of a cloister.

The Remains of the Cloister at Manta Maria

When the security guard reminded me that the conjunct would be closing in 10 minutes, I decided that I had just enough time to make the panorama which I have since made into a banner for the blog.

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One Response to 08-14 Terrassa: Conjunto monumental visigòtico-romànic de Sant Pere de Ègara

  1. Pingback: Blog Directory | The Baileys in Catalunya–Summer, 2012

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