06-17 Day of the Dolmens II

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I’m a bit crazy when it comes to running, and the first thing that came to my mind after I’d made it to Saint Pere de Rodes from our campsite was that I would absolutely love to run up the hill to Saint Pere and then run all the way back down again.  Mind you, that would be 8 km of running up a steep hill with switchbacks and then 8 km back down—it would be about the equivalent of running a half-marathon, given that most half-marathons do not vary that much in elevation—which would have probably left me very tired and unable to cycle for a few days.  Anyways, I thought an excellent substitute given the circumstances would be to cycle to Saint Pere instead, so I was excited to hear that Dad and Mom had had exactly the same idea.

Mom cycling up the mountain to Sant Pere de Rodes

Mom cycling up the mountain to Sant Pere de Rodes

Dad cycling up the mountain to Saint Pere de Rodes

Dad cycling up the mountain to Sant Pere de Rodes

Actually it wasn’t so bad: I was a bit disappointed that I had not run to Saint Pere and met Mom and Dad at the top of the hill.  In any case, our plan was to cycle to the top and then cycle and hike to discover a possible set of 8 (!) dolmens that were marked on our map within a close distance to one another and to Sant Pere, leaving Mom time to sketch one of the dolmens or the church of Sant Helena if she liked.

Paradolmen de la Pallera

Paradolmen de la Pallera

Our plan, unfortunately, was utterly foiled: we discovered not 8, but 11 dolmens in the area, of a possible 14 that were apparently accessible by hiking in the immediate area!  The dolmens were, for the most part, marked using signs and blazes (the “Rutas Megalithicas” A and B) which led us through poorly maintained, sometimes rocky and steep paths with numerous thorns and bristles.  Looking at 11 dolmens in a row may sound a bit monotonous, but each had its own style and character.  My favourite was the one we called “the little suave dolmen” because it had its hat (capstone) tipped to one side.  Dad tried to look equally cool posing for the picture, but he unfortunately couldn’t match up to the little suave dolmen.  I also liked the paradolmen, which was built using rocks protruding from the landscape as building blocks to prop up the capstone.  Mom made a remarkable sketch of a cista (a dolmen with no capstone, like a coffin).

by Gwen

Dolmen Vinyes Mortes II

Dolmen Vinyes Mortes II

Mom sketching Dolmen Vinyes Mortes II

Mom sketching the Coll de Bosc de la Margalla

An example of a broken dolmen: Dolmen de la Creu Blanca

Dolmen de la Creu Blanca

Dolmen Vinyes Mortes I

Dolmen Vinyes Mortes I

Dolmen de la Talaia

Dolmen de la Talaia

The "Little Suave Dolmen" a.k.a. Dolmen de la Carena

Dad isn’t as suave as the “Little Suave Dolmen” a.k.a. Dolmen de la Carena

Dad still isn't as cool as the Dolmen del Puig Margall

Dad still isn’t as cool as the Dolmen del Puig Margall

Dolmen de les Ruines, as seen from behind

Dolmen de les Ruines, as seen from behind

A view of Dolmen de les Ruines from inside

A view of Dolmen de les Ruines from inside

Dolmen del Garrollar

Dolmen del Garrollar

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One Response to 06-17 Day of the Dolmens II

  1. Pingback: Blog Directory | The Baileys in Catalunya–Summer, 2012

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